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1936 ROLLS ROYCE 20/25HP BARKER BROUGHAM DE VILLE









1936 Rolls-Royce 20/25hp Barker Brougham de Ville
Chassis no. GBK 36 - Engine no. L 29 P
Originally sold new to Henry 'Chips' Channon
This highly stylized 20/25hp dates from late in the series production and shows just how diverse a product Barker could offer if their clients so wished. The client in question was Henry 'Chips' Channon a Unionist M.P. and Parliamentary Private Secretary to Undersecretary of State for Foreign Affairs in the U.K. between 1938 and 1941. Channon was a writer who would marry one of the Guinness Brewing firm heiresses and later become a director of that company. The British Rolls-Royce Enthusiasts Club retains the original orders for these cars, and while these confirm Channon to have been the original owner, they also note the car to have left the U.K. in June 1939 to become the property of Alan Corey of Wall Street, New York and Glen Head, Long Island. The notes list the car being shipped through American Express on the S.S. Bremen to New York that summer. In both Belgrave Square, London and on Wall Street, the car must have been quite a statement! How long Corey owned the car or indeed successive owners are not known and since the late 1980s the car has been in Canada and unlisted with the U.S. Rolls-Royce Owner's Club. Originally entirely black, the car has been repainted at some point it is believed in the 1950s to the present two tone scheme, while this serves to display the details of the bodywork, it would most probably benefit from a single color. The repaint may well be sum total of work carried out on the car, for in almost every other respect the car seems exceptionally original. Beneath the front seats are tool trays with a virtually complete set of tools. The body number is stamped into a number of places on the car, including the panels beneath the front seats and also along the seam of the wood panel at the front of the front seats - perhaps to ensure that it wasn't ever lost if removed.